l "" A Persistent Metopic Suture: A Case Report

Case Presentation

Austin J Anat. 2016; 3(1): 1049.

A Persistent Metopic Suture: A Case Report

Seth Gardner*

Department of Natural and Social Sciences, Bowling Green State University Firelands, USA

*Corresponding author: Seth Gardner, Department of Natural and Social Sciences, Bowling Green State University Firelands, Huron, Ohio, USA

Received: March 08, 2016; Accepted: March 18, 2016; Published: March 22, 2016

Abstract

An adult human skull found in a college osteological collection presented with a persistent metopic suture. The metopic suture or frontal suture is noted to be between the two frontal bones extending from the nasion to the bregma. The metopic suture generally fuses between 1 and 8 years of life. If it remains after that time it is known as metopism. Its presence is a normal variant of the cranial sutures. Its presence may be mistaken for a skull fracture and also may be associated with frontal sinus irregularities.

Keywords: Metopic suture; Cranial sutures; Frontal bone

Introduction

The human frontal bones begin to ossify in the mesenchyme via two ossification centers at approximately eight weeks gestation [1]. The two bones tend to fuse in the midline via the metopic or frontal suture. The term metopic is from Greek meaning “in the middle of the face” [2]. The metopic suture is a dentate-type suture extending from the nasion to the bregma [3]. The fusion of the metopic suture normally begins at the nasion proceeding superiorly and terminates at the anterior fontanelle [4]. The suture is situated almost exactly on the median line of the two frontal bones [2]. It usually will close within the first or second year of life, but it has been reported to take up to seven years to fuse [5]. Racial variations have been reported in the literature [6], as well as complications related to incomplete development of the frontal sinus. When the metopic suture persists into adulthood it is known as “metopism”. It is rare to find this suture in adults and its presence is not considered pathological. However, premature closure of any of the cranial sutures results in a pathology known as craniosynostosis [3].

Case Presentation

A dry human skull used in the anatomy program at Bowling Green State University Firelands in Huron, Ohio was found to have a persistent metopic suture or metopism. Based upon the size and shape of the piriform aperture as well as the various other anthropometric markings, the skull was suspected to be from a black male of unknown age. The two frontal bones were clearly seen due to the complete metopic suture. The suture extended from the bregma to the nasion as seen in Figure 1.

Citation: Gardner S. A Persistent Metopic Suture: A Case Report. Austin J Anat. 2016; 3(1): 1049. ISSN : 2381-8921