Prevalence of Behavioral Risk Factors of Noncommunicable Diseases in a Rural Population of Bangladesh

Research Article

Austin J Public Health Epidemiol. 2017; 4(1): 1054.

Prevalence of Behavioral Risk Factors of Noncommunicable Diseases in a Rural Population of Bangladesh

Chandra Banik P*, Mostafa Zaman M, Ahmed J and Reza Choudhury S

Department of Noncommunicable Diseases, Ekhlaspur Centre of Health (ECOH), Bangladesh

*Corresponding author: Chandra Banik P, Department of Noncommunicable Diseases, Ekhlaspur Centre of Health (ECOH), Bangladesh

Received: December 05, 2016; Accepted: February 09, 2017; Published: February 14, 2017

Abstract

Behavioral risk factors reduction is a key to Noncommunicable Diseases (NCDs) control. This survey on NCD risk factors was done in randomly selected cross-sectional sample of 443 rural individuals aged 15 years or older. More than three in ten people used tobacco in some form, and more than nine in ten used extra salt while taking meal. All of them had low fruit and vegetables intake (<5 gm/day). About four and one percent were taking medicines for hypertension and diabetes, respectively. In conclusion, prevalence of tobacco and added salt consumption is fairly high in this rural Bangladeshi sample. Local level health infrastructure and health workers should be used to control these risk factors in rural communities.

Keywords: Non-communicable disease risk factors; Rural community; Bangladesh

Introduction

Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs) are plaguing both developed and developing countries. Tobacco use, physical inactivity, harmful use of alcohol, low consumption of fruit and vegetables and high intake of saltare first line risk factors in Bangladesh and these are generally targeted for NCD control [1,2]. If these risk factors can be controlled at first hand, NCDs could be largely controlled. Health system in Bangladesh is yet to come up with risk factor approach of NCD prevention. In spite of adequate human resource at community level, screening are not done routinely [3]. Before executing any screening and risk factor reduction intervention, it is necessary to know the actual situation at the community. Therefore present study was carried out to determine the prevalence of these risk factors in a village of Bangladesh.

Methods

This study was done in 2011 among residents aged 15 years or older of Ekhlaspur village (Chandpur district). Ekhlaspur Center of Health (ECOH), a non-profit community based non-governmental health care provider has been conducting health examinations in Ekhlaspur since 2001. Ekhlaspur has a total of 1088 households [4]. Five hundred households were approached randomly and one eligible person per household was selected using Kish method [5].

Questions on tobacco (smoking and smokeless) use asked. Amount of added salt while taking meal, fruit and vegetables intakes were determine showing, spoons, cups and show-cards. History of current medication for hypertension and diabetes was obtained. Data were collected by experienced local health assistants of ECOH.

Verbal consent was obtained from the respondents. Prevalence (95% confidence interval) of risk factors were obtained, which were adjusted to WHO’s world standard population.

Results

Altogether 443 adults (225 men, and 218 women) participated. The mean age and schooling of respondents was 40 years and 5 years respectively. Results are presented in (Table 1). Overall age standardized prevalence of current smoking and smokeless tobacco use was 17.5% and 20.2% respectively. Women did not smoke but used smokeless tobacco (27.4%) more than men did (13.8%). Prevalence of taking added salt was very high (93.2%). None of them took minimum 5 servings of fruit and vegetables/day. As defined by history of current medication, age standardized prevalence of hypertension and diabetes was 3.7% and 1.0% respectively.

Citation: Chandra Banik P, Mostafa Zaman M, Ahmed J and Reza Choudhury S. Prevalence of Behavioral Risk Factors of Noncommunicable Diseases in a Rural Population of Bangladesh. Austin J Public Health Epidemiol. 2017; 4(1): 1054. ISSN:2381-9014